Moms Share How Counting to 10 During Pregnancy Saved Their Babies

Moms Share How Counting to 10 During Pregnancy Saved Their Babies

**This purpose of this post is to educate & inform, not cause scare pregnant mamas!

If we could just save one baby, it would all be worth it.

That was our wish for the Count the Kicks campaign that started in Iowa in 2009.

We were five Iowa moms determined to make a difference. We met after we lost daughters within months of each other due to pregnancy complications or stillbirth. Through a series of conversations with doctors and each other, we realized one thing that could help save babies: Counting Kicks.

Our public health campaign, Count the Kicks, teaches expecting parents to track their baby’s movements daily during the third trimester of pregnancy. Scientific studies indicate that in addition to prenatal visits, keeping a daily record of baby’s movements (kicks, rolls, punches, jabs) during the third trimester is an easy, free and reliable way to monitor baby’s well-being and can reduce the rate of stillbirth, which occurs in one in every 160 pregnancies in the United States. (click link to read on Huffington Post)

Could vitamin D make childbirth less painful?

http://www.cbsnews.com/news/could-vitamin-d-make-childbirth-less-painful/

Low vitamin D levels could make childbirth more painful, according to a new study.

Vitamin D deficiency is common during pregnancy, especially among high-risk women, including vegetarians, those with little sun exposure, and members of ethnic minorities, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists says.

The new study included 93 pregnant women whose vitamin D levels were checked before childbirth and who received an epidural for pain during labor. The researchers measured how much pain medication each of the women required during delivery.

(click to read on CBS News website)

Health Officials Call for More Fish in Diets of Children and Pregnant Women

http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/06/10/updated-advice-on-eating-fish-during-pregnancy/

Federal officials on Tuesday announced that they would recommendfor the first time that women who are pregnant or breast-feeding and young children eat a minimum of two servings of low-mercury seafood every week for their health.

The recommendations represent a significant shift for the Food and Drug Administration and the Environmental Protection Agency, whose previous seafood advisory in 2004 set only an upper limit on the amount of fish that these groups should eat.

(click link to read on NYTimes.com)

Length of pregnancy can vary by up to five weeks, scientists discover

The length of a pregnancy naturally varies between different women by as much as five weeks, scientists have discovered for the first time.

Although it has always been known that human pregnancies usually last between 37 and 42 weeks, the variation has previously been attributed to imperfect methods of estimating due dates.

A woman’s due date is calculated as 280 days after the onset of her last menstruation and is only ever considered a best guess. Only four per cent of women deliver on their due date and only 70 per cent within 10 days of it.

(click link above to read the entire article)

Big Babies – The Curse of (mis) Diagnosing a Macrosomic Infant Part.1

http://sarahockwell-smith.com/2012/11/04/big-babies-the-curse-of-mis-diagnosing-a-macrosomic-infant-part-1/

Thousands of women are diagnosed with suspected big babies (or ‘macrosomia’ to use the medical terminology) every year, but this one simple label can have a profound effect on their birth. Obstetric consultants often take the results of growth scans as gospel, scheduling elective C-Sections or inductions as a result of them, but how accurate are these estimates? and does early induction or elective C-Section really prevent problems if a baby is extra large? – you might be surprised at the answer! (click link to read on sarahockwell-smith.com) 

7 Ways a Second Pregnancy Can’t Compare to a First

7 Ways a Second Pregnancy Can’t Compare to a First

Being pregnant with a second child is an entirely different experience than being pregnant with a first. When you’re pregnant the first time, you’re a princess; an amazing, delicate creature growing a new life in a masterful, mysterious way. People are in awe of your majesty. You’re told to rest as much as possible. You’re encouraged to pamper yourself. You’re told you glow! But, for round two, you can forget about the special treatment. You can’t rest or stay off your feet and you don’t get any downtime or alone time, let alone time to pamper yourself. You’re not a magic vessel creating a miracle, but an experienced mom. Do you glow? Maybe, but you do it while covered in pee, poop, blood and snot. For baby two, you’re no longer an innocent newbie — you’ve gone to battle once and you’re an experienced soldier. And you’re about to do it all over again. (click above to read blog on Huff Post)