Planning for Postpartum: Help is Not a Luxury

http://www.mothering.com/articles/planning-for-postpartum-help-is-not-a-luxury/

The idea of a couple growing a family in isolation is new to human society. What we need, in the absence of our families and tribal support systems, is postpartum doulas.

Each of my postpartum experiences was different. For one I was largely dazed and happy, for another I felt upset and overwhelmed, and during one I was losing touch with reality. What they had in common was that I felt unanchored. Adrift. Lost in a sea of beautiful dreams and haunting nightmares that I felt obliged to keep to myself.

Surely this is just how it is. You struggle on, alone. Your triumphs are yours alone. Your grief and anger is yours alone. If you felt you could share, no one could understand anyway. Motherhood is a box.

For many of us, this is how it feels to enter into motherhood for the first or fifth time. You go to your box, sort yourself out, and occasionally over the next few months you’ll venture a peek outside, save up for a short staycation. But mostly, you are the box. You need the box and boy does the box need you.

Or not.

 

(click link above to read the entire article on mothering.com)

 

 

What Does a Doula Do?

http://www.birthzang.co.uk/2016/09/doula/

(click link to read the entire interview on birthzang.co.uk)

I got asked today whether I support women who already have a birth partner, usually their life partner, and yes I do. I think being a doula supporting almost 100 births, I must have done maybe five where there wasn’t also a birth partner present.

These were special because my birth doula role merged somewhat with the birth partner role and it was just me and the birthing woman, journeying towards welcoming her baby and just us in the birth room (with a midwife also).

But most of the time, my role as a doula is ‘space-holder’. I hold space for the couple.

That means I create space for people to explore their thoughts, feelings, options around birth and then when we get to the birth I hold that space allowing them to do their thing – the birthing woman in her birthing power birthing her baby or babies, and the birth partner doing their vital partnering thing of being totally present in each moment with her, usually in absolute awe of her strength and perseverance. I support ‘them’ to have a positive birth experience.”

Click link above to read this great interview with doula Lisa Ramsey on what a doula “does”…

Why Doulas are Expensive (and why you’re glad they are)

http://www.cordmama.com/blog/2015/3/23/why-doulas-are-expensive-and-why-youre-glad-they-are

I spent all of my 30 hours of early labor at home, and most of my six hours of active labor there as well. I continued to delay calling my doula, not knowing how much longer I would be laboring, and certain that I needed that “tool” in my tool belt to realize my goal of an unmedicated, birth center birth. My doula met us at the birth center, and two and a half hours later my daughter was born in the water and placed on my chest.

Now, I won’t break it down for you (though my husband might) what it cost us per hour to have doula support for my final 2.5 hours, but what I will tell you:

It was worth every single penny. 

(click link above to read article)

Dear Friend, Birth Doesn’t Have to Suck

http://www.improvingbirth.org/2014/06/dear-friend/

#4 Get a Damn Doula

Have you ever cut your hair yourself?  It might turn out okay, but then you get it done at the salon with the hypnotizing head massage and the mysterious, magical products and the blow-out-you-can-never-replicate and you realize, yeah, that was better with professionals.  That’s kind of what doulas are to birth. (click link to read a great post on improvingbirth.org)

Medicaid and Doulas: New York Coalition for Doula Access (everymothercounts.org)

http://everymothercounts.org/blog/201310/medicaid-and-doulas-new-york-coalition-doula-access

“Doula’s provide cost reductions because they are responsible for a 20-21% potential reduction in c-section rates. They foster an open and supportive labor environment that works to avoid intervention and the costs related to those interventions. They found there were significant savings in New York specifically, a state with high birth rates and high numbers of people with Medicaid”….(click link to read on everymothercounts.org)

Reducing Infant Mortality-short film on Vimeo

Reducing Infant Mortality from Debby Takikawa on Vimeo.

Watch this wonderful new short film, then forward it to everyone you know who cares about mothers, babies, and our health-care system; then sent it to your legislator along with letter (a sample is on the film website). This matters! We have the opportunity to MAKE CHANGE!