Top Ten Signs Your Doctor Is Planning To Perform An Unnecessary Cesarean Section On You

http://friscowomenshealth.com/Blog/Cesarean-Section/Top-Ten-Signs-Your-Doctor-Is-Planning-To-Perform-An-Unnecessary-Cesarean-Section-On-You.html

Fourteen years I have been practicing OB/GYN. I live in Frisco, Texas one of the fastest growing cities in the United States I really enjoy living and working here. It is a great place for my family and for the first time my office is attached to the one hospital I practice in. This is the third and final place I will practice medicine. I trained with some of the most respected academic OB/GYN’s in the country. These physicians contribute to the books on Obstetrics, create the practice guidelines for the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), and taught me to practice medicine based on scientific evidence.

I follow a few simple rules; do no harm, give your patients options, and provide information so they can make informed decisions. So, last night I was sitting in my office looking at the fourth Cesarean Section (C/S) operative report of the day for yet another patient who wants to have a vaginal delivery following a previous C/S. I am frustrated and feel like I am fighting a losing battle.

(click above link to read a great article by an OB-GYN)

Cesarean Rates and State Rankings Within the US

http://birthmonopoly.com/birth-map/

-CLICK LINK ABOVE TO VIEW MAP and see current statistics-

This map shows rates and rankings for U.S. states, with the states in five groups of ten (plus D.C.). The lowest rates of Cesarean are in the lightest color, to the highest rates in the darkest. California currently has a 33.2% c-section rate, 20th WORST in the US! Utah has a 22.6% rate, the LOWEST  in the nation.

Click http://www.cesareanrates.com/blog/2013/2/3/what-is-practice-variation-in-obstetrics-and-why-should-i-ca.html for why you should care

Nation’s Ob-Gyns Take Aim at Preventing Cesareans

http://www.acog.org/About_ACOG/News_Room/News_Releases/2014/Nations_Ob-Gyns_Take_Aim_at_Preventing_Cesareans

New Guideline Recommends Allowing Women to Labor Longer to Help Avoid Cesarean

February 19, 2014

Washington, DC — Allowing most women with low-risk pregnancies to spend more time in the first stage of labor may avoid unnecessary cesareans, according to The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (The College) and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM). In a jointly-issued Obstetric Care Consensus guideline, the new recommendations are targeted at preventing women from having cesareans with their first birth and at decreasing the national cesarean rate.

“Evidence now shows that labor actually progresses slower than we thought in the past, so many women might just need a little more time to labor and deliver vaginally instead of moving to a cesarean delivery,” said Aaron B. Caughey, MD, a member of The College’s Committee on Obstetric Practice who helped develop the new recommendations. “Most women who have had a cesarean with their first baby end up having repeat cesarean deliveries for subsequent babies, and this is what we’re trying to avoid. By preventing the first cesarean delivery, we should be able to reduce the nation’s overall cesarean delivery rate.”

(click link above to read on acog.org)

 

Medicaid and Doulas: New York Coalition for Doula Access (everymothercounts.org)

http://everymothercounts.org/blog/201310/medicaid-and-doulas-new-york-coalition-doula-access

“Doula’s provide cost reductions because they are responsible for a 20-21% potential reduction in c-section rates. They foster an open and supportive labor environment that works to avoid intervention and the costs related to those interventions. They found there were significant savings in New York specifically, a state with high birth rates and high numbers of people with Medicaid”….(click link to read on everymothercounts.org)

What is the Evidence for Induction or C-section for a Big Baby?

What is the Evidence for Induction or C-section for a Big Baby?

What is a big baby?

The medical term for big baby is macrosomia, which literally means “big body.” Some experts consider a baby to be big when it weighs more than 4,000 grams (8 pounds 13 ounces) at birth, and others say a baby is big if it weighs more than 4,500 grams (9 pounds, 15 ounces). A baby is also called “large for gestational age” if its weight is greater than the 90th percentile at birth.  (CLICK link above to read article)