Giving Birth and the C-Section Stigma

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/giving-birth-and-the-c-section-stigma_us_57dac1a8e4b053b1ccf294b0?

(click link above to read the entire post on huffingtonpost.com)

 

Giving birth has nothing to do with pushing. It has nothing to do with contractions. It has nothing to do with pain.

Giving birth has everything to do with giving.

In this final sacrosanct act of pregnancy, all is set aside as the mother does whatever it takes to give her baby life. In every birth it requires different sacrifices. But the beauty of it, every time, is that the mother was willing to do it.

Pushing does not make a mother.

Natural Birth After A Caesarean: New Guidelines Assure Women It’s ‘Possible And Safe’

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/2015/10/02/natural-birth-after-caesarean_n_8231566.html?edition=uk

“New guidance from the RCOG states a vaginal birth after a previous caesarean section has a success rate of around 75%, which is the same as for first-time mothers.

Even if the woman has had two or more previous caesareans the success rate of a vaginal birth only reduces slightly to 71%.”

(click link above to read the post from 2015)

Researchers Test Microbe Wipe To Promote Babies’ Health After C-Sections

http://www.npr.org/sections/health-shots/2016/02/01/464905786/researchers-test-microbe-wipe-to-promote-babies-health-after-c-sections

Babies get a lot from their mothers. But babies born by cesarean section don’t pass through the birth canal and miss out on the benefits from picking up Mom’s microbes on the way out.

Researchers studying the human microbiome have asked: Could there be a way to fix that? If so, it might help restore the microbes a baby naturally gets that help fight off disease and foster normal development.

A small study published Monday in Nature Medicine provides tantalizing evidence that it may be possible.

How? By slathering babies just after birth with a gauze pad that soaked up the microbes in their mothers’ birth canal right before birth.

(click link  above to read on NPR.org)

THE BIG BABY CONUNDRUM

http://blog.everymothercounts.org/the-big-baby-conundrum/

When I read the January 11th New York Times Well blog, titled When A Big Baby Isn’t So Big, I looked back on my career as a labor nurse and thought, “Yep – happens all the time.” Predictions for a “too big baby” were among the most common reasons I heard from women admitted to my labor unit for induction of labor or scheduled cesarean sections. In most cases, once the baby was delivered, either vaginally or surgically, they weren’t all that big after all.

The New York Times blog is centered around a recent study based on Childbirth Connection’s national survey of 1,960 new mothers, called Listening to Mothers III. The survey indicates that four out of five mothers who were warned they might have large babies gave birth to infants who were not large, and weighed less than 8 pounds 13 ounces (which defines macrosomia – a larger than average baby). These mothers were almost twice as likely to have interventions like medical induction of labor or attempt to self-induce labor, presumably so their baby wouldn’t get too big to deliver vaginally. They were also nearly twice as likely to have planned C-sections, though as the blog mentions, researchers say that increase fell just short of being statistically meaningful.

(click link to read the blog on the Every Mother Counts website)

Top Ten Signs Your Doctor Is Planning To Perform An Unnecessary Cesarean Section On You

http://friscowomenshealth.com/Blog/Cesarean-Section/Top-Ten-Signs-Your-Doctor-Is-Planning-To-Perform-An-Unnecessary-Cesarean-Section-On-You.html

Fourteen years I have been practicing OB/GYN. I live in Frisco, Texas one of the fastest growing cities in the United States I really enjoy living and working here. It is a great place for my family and for the first time my office is attached to the one hospital I practice in. This is the third and final place I will practice medicine. I trained with some of the most respected academic OB/GYN’s in the country. These physicians contribute to the books on Obstetrics, create the practice guidelines for the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), and taught me to practice medicine based on scientific evidence.

I follow a few simple rules; do no harm, give your patients options, and provide information so they can make informed decisions. So, last night I was sitting in my office looking at the fourth Cesarean Section (C/S) operative report of the day for yet another patient who wants to have a vaginal delivery following a previous C/S. I am frustrated and feel like I am fighting a losing battle.

(click above link to read a great article by an OB-GYN)

Cesarean Rates and State Rankings Within the US

http://birthmonopoly.com/birth-map/

-CLICK LINK ABOVE TO VIEW MAP and see current statistics-

This map shows rates and rankings for U.S. states, with the states in five groups of ten (plus D.C.). The lowest rates of Cesarean are in the lightest color, to the highest rates in the darkest. California currently has a 33.2% c-section rate, 20th WORST in the US! Utah has a 22.6% rate, the LOWEST  in the nation.

Click http://www.cesareanrates.com/blog/2013/2/3/what-is-practice-variation-in-obstetrics-and-why-should-i-ca.html for why you should care

Nation’s Ob-Gyns Take Aim at Preventing Cesareans

http://www.acog.org/About_ACOG/News_Room/News_Releases/2014/Nations_Ob-Gyns_Take_Aim_at_Preventing_Cesareans

New Guideline Recommends Allowing Women to Labor Longer to Help Avoid Cesarean

February 19, 2014

Washington, DC — Allowing most women with low-risk pregnancies to spend more time in the first stage of labor may avoid unnecessary cesareans, according to The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (The College) and the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM). In a jointly-issued Obstetric Care Consensus guideline, the new recommendations are targeted at preventing women from having cesareans with their first birth and at decreasing the national cesarean rate.

“Evidence now shows that labor actually progresses slower than we thought in the past, so many women might just need a little more time to labor and deliver vaginally instead of moving to a cesarean delivery,” said Aaron B. Caughey, MD, a member of The College’s Committee on Obstetric Practice who helped develop the new recommendations. “Most women who have had a cesarean with their first baby end up having repeat cesarean deliveries for subsequent babies, and this is what we’re trying to avoid. By preventing the first cesarean delivery, we should be able to reduce the nation’s overall cesarean delivery rate.”

(click link above to read on acog.org)