Saving Babies’ Lives by Carrying Them Like Kangaroos

Skin-to-skin contact sustains premature babies where incubators are limited. It may even be the best form of neonatal care, period.

https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/02/kangaroo-care/515844/

Carmela Torres was 18 when she became pregnant for the first time. It was 1987 and she and her now-husband, Pablo Hernandez, were two idealistic young Colombians born in the coastal region of Montería who moved to the capital, Bogotá, in search of freedom and a better life. When Torres told her father she was expecting, so angered was he by the thought of his daughter having a child out of wedlock that they didn’t speak to each other for years.

Before she had a chance to hold him, her baby was whisked off to a neonatal intensive-care unit. Torres was simply told to get dressed and go home. “I didn’t even get to touch him,” she says. “They said I could come back and see him but the visiting times were very restricted—just a couple of hours a day. When I did visit I was allowed to look but not touch.”

(click link above to read the story on theatlantic.com)

 

30 Birth Photos That Show Pure, Beautiful Love

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/30-birth-photos-that-show-pure-beautiful-love_us_58068a7fe4b0b994d4c24b9a

(click link above to see some amazing photos of ALL types of labors and births…)

Oh, my heart…

No matter how a baby’s birth unfolds ― whether it’s a first-time mom having a C-section, or a third-time mother fighting through a labor that lasts two full days ― childbirth is hard and it is messy.

But in between all the, well, laboring are moments of love. Love between partners, love between families and doctors, doulas and midwives, an)d that very special love when parents and babies lock eyes for the very first time.

Here, talented birth photographers share photos they’ve captured that celebrate those moments of pure joy and connection in childbirth.

 

Photo by Capturing Joy Birth Services:

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What High-Risk Pregnant Women Need to Hear

http://www.brandyferner.com/what-high-risk-pregnant-women-need-to-hear/

The transition from being an innocent, hopeful and glowing pregnant woman to one that’s stamped “high-risk” is not an easy one. Sometimes something urgent and scary happens that immediately flips that coin and other times the change is like a slow-moving car driving towards a new state line. Regardless of how quickly the new reality emerges, women in this uncharted territory have an added and unwelcome layer of stress, worry and decision-making. Giving birth in general requires us to step into the unknown, but being high-risk means we take that step with a little or a lot of extra weight strapped to us.

(click link above to read this great post on brandyferner.com)

Subjective childbirth experiences determine trauma risk

http://sciencenordic.com/subjective-childbirth-experiences-determine-trauma-risk

A woman’s subjective experience of giving birth has more impact on her mental condition afterwards than any real complications occurring in the delivery room. (click link above to read this interesting study)